White Guys With Guns

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White Guys With Guns

A companion discussion to the play, Conceal and Carry, by Sean Lewis

 

Monday, November 2 at 6pm

Livestreamed on the Borderlands Theater Facebook page

 

Featured Panelists:

Jennifer Carlson, PhD

Nolan Cabrera, PhD

 

Moderated by:

Michelle Téllez, PhD

 

Borderlands Theater, in collaboration with Labyrinth Theatre and SplitSeed Productions, presents a lively “post-show” discussion examining the psychology and social forces behind white males and guns in America. What entitles someone to join a militia, or in the extreme, to go on shooting spree? Why are these individuals overwhelmingly white males?

 

Watch the play Conceal and Carry before the discussion at:  

https://www.facebook.com/splitseedproductions/videos/969345853587129

 

 

Jennifer Carlson is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Arizona and author of the books Policing the Second Amendment: Guns, Law Enforcement and the Politics of Race and Citizen Protectors: The Everyday Politics of Guns in the Age of Decline. She is currently writing a book on the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on American gun markets, gun culture, and gun politics, entitled Not with a Bang but a Whimper: Guns and the America Politics of Crisis. 

 

Nolan Cabrera is a nationally-recognized expert in the areas of racism/anti-racism on college campuses, Whiteness, and ethnic studies. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Center for the Study of Higher Education at the University of Arizona. His book, White Guys on Campus, is a deep exploration of White male racism, and occasional anti-racism, on college campuses. He has given hundreds of lectures, keynote addresses, and trainings, throughout the country on challenging racism/Whiteness, working through unconscious bias, creating inclusive college campuses, and the expansion of ethnic studies programs.

 

Michelle Téllez is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mexican American Studies at the University of Arizona. She writes about transnational community formations, Chicana feminism, and gendered migration for academic journals, books and as public scholarship. A founding member of the Chicana M(other)work collective, the Arizona Son Jarocho Collective, and the Binational Arts Residency project, Dr. Téllez has a long history in grassroots organizing projects and community-based arts and performance. She co-edited The Chicana M(other)work Anthology: Porque Sin Madres No Hay Revolución, published in March of 2019.